Water covers almost 75% of the earth. There are oceans, lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, and brooks. There’s salt water and fresh water and well water. Water falls from the sky, helping plants grow and thrive. It makes up approximately 60% of an adult body. The body needs water to hydrate, to survive. Baristas use water to make your morning coffee or cup of tea. It’s important. And it’s basically everywhere. It’s above and below and even inside. It’s written in songs played on the radio. You can’t get away from water, so maybe it’s time to dive in and learn to swim.

Perhaps you never learned when you were younger. Or you didn’t have the ability to practice often, so you’re kind of rusty. Maybe there’s even a little bit of trepidation when it comes to immersing yourself in one of nature’s greatest forces. Whatever the reason, knowing how to swim is an important life skill. And no matter your age or current swim skill level, you’re never too old to learn how to swim.

Survival Skill

Federal statistics reveal that an average of 10 people accidentally drown every day in the United States. Another survey, done by the Red Cross this year, discovered that more than half of Americans are either unable to swim or have not mastered five basic safety skills, such as the ability to swim 25 yards. Living on a planet consisting of mostly water necessitates the ability to swim. Whether or not it becomes enjoyable or recreational, it is important for safety and perhaps even survival.

Cultivate Confidence

Although you may have convinced yourself that it’s too late to learn how to swim, you’re never too old to pursue new goals and achieve new dreams. As with any other new skill, learning how to swim is a process. Perfecting each phase, from stepping off the last stair to dunking your head under the water to floating on your back, brings a sense of accomplishment that fuels your drive to strive for success. Moving through each phase builds self-esteem, creating greater determination to complete the final phase.

Visit your local YCMA or community pool to get started. Check out a swim lesson, meet with an instructor, or research swim classes offered in your area. The ultimate confidence attained when you realize you can swim offers a reminder that you can learn new things, no matter your age or previous experience. Once you check swimming off of your bucket list, then perhaps you can jump to the next one, like learning a new language or going back to school for that degree you always wanted. With the right tools, attitude, and dedication, success is possible and dreams can come true.

Enjoy Experiences

Knowing how to swim opens up a variety of fun water activities, allowing you to expand your fitness horizons and continue to try new things using your newly acquired skill. Ride that confidence-boosting wave and learn another new activity. If you’re close to the ocean, then maybe you could check out surfing or snorkeling. Lakes are a great place to try paddle boarding, kayaking, and jet skiing. Tubing is a popular river activity. Maybe you could push yourself to train for, and participate in, a triathlon.

You could experience the health benefits of a morning swim or simply enjoy an afternoon at the pool with your children or grandchildren. Don’t let your age keep you from swimming in the deep end.

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